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Photo Galleries

Mig-15 Fagot, MiG-15bis:

 

AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM
OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

Perhaps the most famous MiG-15 in the world today is the one on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.  The aircraft was flown to South Korea by defecting pilot, Lieutenant No Kim-Sok, on September 21, 1953, where he received a $100,000 reward for delivering the aircraft to the United States.  It was first tested and evaluated in Okinawa, and then it was moved to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base for additional testing.  It was offered back to its “rightful owners” by the United States, but the Soviets, who had denied their participation in the Korean War, did not accept the offer.  It was then given to the National Museum of the United States Air Force, where it remains on display to this day. 

In August 1979, Bert Kinzey & Bill Slatton were given permission to photograph and measure the aircraft extensively and to analyze its details.  While the aircraft is basically a MiG-15bis, there are clearly some features that indicate that some parts from a MiG-15 were substituted at some point in time, perhaps to repair damage.  Both early and late MiG-15bis features can be found on the aircraft.

Most of the photographs in this set were taken by Bert Kinzey during that visit in August 1979.  Most are in color, and were originally color slides.  A few black and white supplemental photographs are also provided.  Three additional black and white cockpit photos, taken by the U. S. Air Force, are also included in this photo set to show what the cockpit looked like when the aircraft was surrendered to the United States.

Detail & Scale thanks the director and staff of National Museum of the United States Air Force for their cooperation in obtaining these detail photographs.

Click on the thumbnails at the left (below) to view a larger image.


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Like many western fighters of the day, the MiG-15 had a black instrument panel and a cockpit that was painted a gray color. Note the thicker center section of the windscreen in this view. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A close-up of the instrument panel provides a good look at its details. Although two instruments are missing, those that are present are not unlike those found in military aircraft from other nations during the 1950s. Note also the Korean inscription painted in red at the top center of the panel. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This look at the right side of the cockpit shows many exposed wires and plumbing. This does not represent the original condition of the cockpit. Several panels are missing. Compare this to the official Air Force photo of the right side of the cockpit as provided below to see what this side of the cockpit looked like when this MiG-15 was turned over to the Air Force. (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A good look at the instrument panel, gun sight, and the forward right side of the cockpit is provided here.  The gray used in the cockpit had a bluish tint to it.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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By contrast, this is an official U. S. Air Force photo of the same cockpit taken shortly after the MiG-15bis was turned over to the American forces in Korea by the defecting pilot.  Note that some of the original instruments are different from the ones shown in the later photographs above.  This and the next two photographs are included in this photo set to show the original appearance of the cockpit.  By the time Detail & Scale photographed it in 1979, several changes had been made, and it was no longer in this configuration.  (Official U. S. Air Force photo)

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Another Air Force photograph shows the left side of the cockpit including the throttle.  This photo accurately shows the configuration of the cockpit in a MiG-15bis as built.  (Official U. S. Air Force photo)

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Compare this photograph of the right side of the cockpit to the one of the same area above.  This is what the right side of the cockpit looked like when the aircraft was received by the U. S. Air Force.  (Official U. S. Air Force photo)

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Although this aircraft is a MiG-15bis, it had the landing light located at the top of the air flow divider in the inlet.  This feature was on standard MiG-15 Fagot A and early MiG-15bis Fagot B aircraft, but on later MiG-15bis fighters, a retractable landing light under the left wing root replaced the one shown here.  A photograph of the later retractable light can be found in MiG-15 Photo Set 4.  Also note that the gun blast deflector under the intake lip is the one-piece design.  This would indicate a later MiG-15bis.  It should also be noted that the three cannons have been removed from this aircraft, and they are on display separately in the museum.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Details of the canopy are visible in this view.  Compare the framing with that on the MiG-15 in our MiG-17 Photo Set 3. Also note that there was no rear view mirror on the MiG-15’s canopy as there was on the MiG-17.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The antenna mast is shown here from the left side.  Note the antenna wire attached to it and its two insulators.  This feature indicates an early MiG-15bis.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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In this view, the antenna mast is shown again, and the secondary wire that runs from the main wire to the connection point on the fuselage is visible.  Later production MiG-17bis fighters had the main antenna wire running from the top of the vertical tail directly to the connection point without any connection to the antenna mast.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The various panels on the spine of the fuselage are shown here.  Note that this aircraft did not have the IFF blade antenna on the spine as found on many MiG-15bis aircraft.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The EKSR-46 flare launcher was located on the right side of the aft fuselage and could be loaded with red, blue, yellow, and white flares.  On MiG-15 Fagot As, the launcher was mounted lower on the fuselage than shown here.  This is the position used on the MiG-15bis Fagot B.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A speed brake was located on each side of the aft fuselage.  These could be deployed manually, and they also operated automatically if the aircraft approached a speed where it would become uncontrollable.  This is the speed brake on the left side of the aft fuselage, and it is the larger design used on the MiG-15bis.  Also note the tail bumper under the fuselage.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The entire right side of the aft fuselage is shown here.  The locations of the EKSR-46 flare launcher and the speed brake are visible.  As displayed by the museum, the MiG-15bis is now painted in the markings it carried when Lieutenant Ro Kim-Suk defected with it in Korea.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A non-skid walkway was applied to the top of each wing root.   (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Details on top of the left wing are shown here.  Note the different shades of metal used in the aircraft’s construction.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Almost the entire upper surface of the right wing is visible in this photograph.  Note the two wing fences   This compared to the three fences on the MiG-17’s larger and thinner wing.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The wing fences on the right wing are shown again from behind the wing.  The non-skid walkway on the right wing root is also visible.   (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A long pitot probe was mounted on each wing near the tip.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The nose gear and the fairings for the two 23-mm cannons are seen here from the left.  The short fairings for the cannon barrels and the fairings for the shell ejection slots are both features indicative of a late MiG-15bis.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The nose landing gear is shown here from the right as is the fairing for the 37-mm cannon.  Note also the fairing for the shell ejection slot on the cannon.  This again indicates a later MiG-15bis.  The blast plate for the cannon extended onto the leading edge of the nose gear doors.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The main landing gear was covered with three doors, one of which was attached to the strut and another to the strut and the outboard end of the gear well.  This is the right main landing gear from the outside.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Details of the left main landing gear are revealed here.  Additional details of the MiG-15’s landing gear can be found in MiG-15 Photo Sets 3 and 4.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The horizontal tail was mounted relatively high on the vertical tail and had no dihedral.  The point where the antenna wire attached to the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer is clearly visible.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This photo shows the attachment of the horizontal stabilizer.  The rudder was in two sections with one being above and the other below the horizontal tail.  Careful examination of this photo will reveal where a red star was once painted on the tail of this aircraft.  However, this was added after the defection then subsequently removed.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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The top part of the rudder is shown here along with its dark gray counterbalance at the top of the hinge line.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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This underside view of the horizontal tail shows that there was an adjustable elevator trim tab on the left elevator at its inboard end.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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A general right side view of the MiG-15bis in black and white concludes this photo set.  (Detail & Scale copyright photo by Bert Kinzey)

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Just Released!

JET FIGHTERS
OF THE U. S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS
PART 1: THE FIRST TEN YEARS
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Detail & Scale Special Edition Books

U. S. Navy and Marine Carrier-Based Aircraft of World War II
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Attack on Pearl Harbor, Japan Awakens a Sleeping Giant

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Colors & Markings Series



Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 1: Atlantic
Coast Squadrons
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Colors & Markings of the F-102
Delta Dagger

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Colors & Markings of U. S. Navy
F-14 Tomcats,
Part 2: Pacific
Coast Squadrons

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